Ohio School for the Deaf Library

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Established in 1829, the Ohio School for the Deaf serves students from all over Ohio who are deaf or hard-of-hearing. The school has over 200 students from preschool age through high school and also offers a program for graduates called 4PLUS, which helps young adults transition to life after school.

 

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Ohio School for the Deaf library staff Tatum Cook and Nancy Boone

Librarian Nancy Boone began her career with the school as a teacher and worked with students in elementary, junior high and high school before taking on the role of librarian. With help from Library Assistant Tatum Cook, Nancy provides opportunities and programming for all of the students at the school. Tatum joined the library staff earlier this year and is a graduate of Ohio School for the Deaf. She previously worked in the preschool. Student workers also assist with shelving and other tasks around the library.

 

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The OSD Library is a bright, welcoming space for students to enjoy

The OSD Library was built in 2013 and features ample natural lighting, open space and plenty of room for books. Nancy was able to reduce the collection size by using more digital reference tools, but noted that the collection of graphic novels has boomed since she’s been with the library.

Class groups visit the library regularly throughout the week to check out books, work on their reading skills and enjoy story time. They provide programming for high school classes as well, such as information literacy for students studying journalism. The library maintains a flexible schedule to accommodate all levels of students and is open after school hours for the students who live on campus during the week.

 

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Library goldfish greet visitors

Nancy and Tatum create eye-catching, fun displays to engage students, and collections are marked with bright visual aids, allowing students to easily locate materials and navigate the library. The library features a large story time area, where books are read in sign language and acted out by Nancy and Tatum for the enjoyment of the students.

 

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The history of Ohio School for the Deaf is part of the deaf collection

The library maintains a large collection of deaf materials, including books and videos related to deafness, sign language, education and culture. The library also offers DVDs and materials developed by the Shared Reading Project and designed to help parents and tutors of deaf children effectively share books with their children.

The fun environment, special collection and range of services provided by the staff make the library at Ohio School for the Deaf incredibly special.

 

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Back to School

It’s hard to believe summer is coming to an end and school will start again in a few short weeks. Over the years, we have had the opportunity to meet with wonderful school and academic librarians from a variety of institutions.

We thought it would be fun to look back and to catch up with some of our friends at school libraries to learn about their plans for the 2017-18 school year.
 

Dr. Christina Dorr, media specialist at Hilliard Weaver Middle School, is ramping up for the school year with Cat Days, a two-day orientation that helps students explore the building, learn their schedules and pick up their school books and iPads. The library helps manage the school’s one 2 one program, offering students technical support for their iPads. Once school is in session, Dr. Dorr will provide library orientation classes to incoming middle schoolers and refresh upperclassmen on the library’s role. She provides the students with information about how to access the library’s collections, check out material and ebooks, and opportunities to volunteer and participate in library events.

In October, the school will welcome award winning author Jason Reynolds. In preparation for the event, students have been reading his books and some even met over the summer discuss his works at the local Starbucks.  Dr. Dorr is working in collaboration with other teachers to engage the students in anticipation of the event and has planned a number of fun activities that will excite them make for fantastic event.

Dr. Dorr is also looking forward to working with student groups, including the book club, Books and Brownies, and the newly established Gay/Straight Alliance. Dr. Dorr is enthusiastic and energized for the new school year. Her students are sure to have a fantastic year!

Windermere Elemetary School librarian Shannon Hemmelgarn is excited to begin another school year too! Her summer activities have included efforts to keep students reading year-round with the use of social media and in-person book chats. Her summer reading included “Refugee” by Alan Gratz and “Return to Sender” by Julia Alvarez, middle grade stories that tackle issues in today’s world. Shannon shared that this reading can be used to help approach tough topics and start important conversations with youth.

The new school year promises plenty of excitement for Windermere Elementary. Shannon has been working on new curriculum for her students to help improve their information literacy skills (and avoid “fake news”), digital citizenship and responsible technology use. Shannon has partnered with the youth services librarian at Upper Arlington Public Library to provide a story hour for kindergartners and their families. She will work with students of all grades to engage them and reintroduce them to the library.

In April, the district will welcome author and storyteller Mac Barnett. Library lessons will help prepare and engage students for this exciting event. Shannon is also organizing a family reading program, inviting students and their families to read Because of Winn Dixie by Kate DiCamillo. The program includes activities and contests and will commence with a viewing of the movie. Shannon’s excitement for the year to come is contagious – her students are in for a fun school year!

Thank you to all that are creating learning centers of excellence–we wish everyone a fantastic year!  Additionally, check out these other amazing school & academic libraries we’ve featured:

CCAD Packard Library

Columbus State Community College Library

Fort Hayes Arts and Academic High School

Leigh Bonds & OSU Libraries

Mount Carmel Health Sciences Library

The Ohio State University Fine Arts Library

Oberlin College Libraries

Oberlin College Conservatory Library

OSU Billy Ireland Cartoon Library and Museum

OSU Byrd Polar Archive

OSU Historic Costume and Textiles Collection

Pontifical College Josephinum Library

Columbus Business First

Columbus Business First provides valuable business, leadership and industry information.  Central Ohioans and those seeking to learn more can use the news to make important business decisions, understand industry front runners and learn more about Central Ohio executives and rising leaders. The paper, owned by American City Business Journals (ACBJ), offers an insightful weekly publication and a variety of other resources including The Book of Lists, Forty Under 40 awards, daily and breaking news emails and other business awards.

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Columbus Business First monthly publications

Research Director Robin Smith creates, edits and manages the paper’s many lists which are featured in weekly publications and collected annually to form The Book of Lists.  Robin leverages the company’s proprietary database, commercial databases, public records and online surveys to gather and analyze data for the lists. Topics for the list are decided by Robin, the editorial staff and ACBJ. In 2016, The Book of Lists contained 72 lists, but the number varies from year to year, depending on the market and relevant topics. June’s featured list explores Ohio’s Craft Brewers.

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Reception at Columbus Business First

Robin shared her process for creating the lists. She sends surveys to businesses in the category of the list she is building six weeks in advance of the list’s publication date, and she follows up several times to ensure that the companies can participate. Information is self reported by the companies and verified through research and comparison from previous years. Lists are based on quantitative data and vary depending on the industry. Often, Robin works with the editorial staff when creating a list and stories related to the list subject are run in the same issue.

The job requires understanding and processing large amounts of data. Robin noted the largest list she complied examined 850 companies! As a member of an investigative reporting organization, she has learned new tips and tricks to help manage these kinds of data-intensive projects.

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Research Director Robin Smith

Robin began her career in graphic design and worked with Business First as an ad designer for six years. Later, she performed freelance research services and co-authored Ohio Then & Now: Contemporary Rephotography. Her research and time in libraries and archives sparked her interest, which led her to complete her master’s degree in library science.

Robin enjoys that her work provides difficult to attain information, demonstrating a valuable skill for many businesses and individuals. In addition to her research, she leads classes for Columbus Business First subscribers on how to harness the power of The Book of Lists. Interaction with users gives her the opportunity to learn first-hand the value of her work. One small business owner featured in the minority-owned business list shared her company’s clients significantly increased after being featured. Now that’s making a positive difference!

Companies and individuals use Columbus Business First’s information for sales, recruiting, purchasing decisions and many other research purposes.  The work of Robin Smith and Columbus Business First is crucial for many in our community.

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OSU Historic Costume and Textiles Collection

Located in Campbell Hall on The Ohio State University campus, the Historic Costume and Textiles Collection is truly a gem in the university’s crown. The collection, part of OSU’s College of Education and Human Ecology, was established by Ohio State faculty in the 1920s and has grown through donations and acquisitions into an expansive collection of nearly 12,000 items.

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Clothing, arranged by decade in the climate controlled archive

The collection includes an array of items, including clothing, buttons and accessories dating back to the mid-18th century and some textiles go back much further – the oldest European items dating to 1450-1510 and pre-Columbian South American  to the 9th-11th century.  These pieces provide a rich perspective into the evolution of culture over time. Students, faculty and visitors can study the changing fashions of men, women and children from around the world, lending insight into the culture of the times and bringing to life periods of history in a unique way.

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Curator Gayle Strege shows off some of her favorite pieces

Gayle Strege, collection curator, joined the university in 1996 and has played an instrumental role in creating digital access, improving organization and preservation, and curating engaging exhibits to highlight the importance of the collection. Gayle, whose background includes theater costuming  and museum work, is passionate about textiles and fascinated with the way items are constructed. She enjoys helping students discover connections between the garment and the history of the individuals who created and wore it. The collection is frequently studied by the 20th Century Fashion History course, offered in the Fashion/Retail Studies major. Courses including Women in Modern Europe (History), Women and Gender in the US (History) and Children and Childhood in the Western World (History), Art History, Education and English Literature are a few of the other classes that access the collection to create a deeper understanding of the cultures and subjects they study. Students visit the collection in person and can access many items on the collection’s website, which provides detailed images and background information.

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Buttons are categorized by color, size, type and other attributes on large cards

The collection also contains an assortment of over 25,000 buttons which were gifted to the university by former Battelle librarian Ann Rudolph. The buttons are organized on cards by a variety of characteristics, including size, shape, color and material and provide an ongoing project for the collections caretakers – photographing and cataloging them for future enthusiasts!

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All Wrapped Up: An Example of Fashionable Outerwear will run through April 2017

The Historic Costume and Textile Collection operates a gallery in Campbell Hall.  The current exhibit celebrates a variety of fashionable outerwear, providing a rich “history of fashion in the shape of capes, coats, and cloaks”. Past exhibits include bridal fashion and Columbus’ fashion story.  The gallery is free and open to the public and we highly recommend visiting.

The Ohio State University Historic Costume and Textile Collection is amazing and culturally important, giving audiences the opportunity to experience the technical aspects, aesthetics and social meaning of apparel and textiles.

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Grove City Library

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In October 2016, Grove City Library opened the doors of a beautiful new building and welcomed the community into an open, vibrant environment designed to provide a functional, safe and flexible space to customers for years to come. The community responded enthusiastically to the opening of the new building — the library saw an uptick of over 1,500 new library cards registered in November 2016 over November 2015!

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The library offers plenty of quiet space, in addition to gathering spaces

 

Grove City Library, a member of the Southwest Public Libraries, was founded in 1917 by the Women’s Civic Club of Grove City. Southwest Public Libraries is the second largest library system in Franklin county, serving more than 130,000 people over 127 square miles.

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Assistant Director Bethanne Johnson

Assistant Director Bethanne Johnson manages the daily operations of the library and helped oversee the construction of the new building. She graciously provided our tour of the space and pointed out key design features, including modular furniture equipped with power outlets, new meeting spaces, study rooms and a dynamic youth service department. Johnson, who has been with the library for 32 years, helped to oversee the redesign and relocation of the library. She shared that she loves her job, the people she works with and the people she serves. She enjoys the community and the opportunity to share in the lives of her patrons.

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Non-fiction selection, overlooking the youth services department

The library’s new design succeeds in keeping books as a key feature of the space.  Bookshelves are abundant, but do not interrupt the open feel of the library.

The versatile meeting room can seat up to 400 guests and is ideal for hosting summer reading programs, community events and special programming like the Military History program. The meeting room, as well as many of the study spaces feature state-of-the art technology, including smart boards and projector screens.

Harper’s Grove, the youth services department made possible by a generous gift from the family of the library’s first librarian, Irene Harper, is cleverly designed to reflect the library logo’s tree theme. The space incorporates work and play areas for children and parents of all ages. Learning centers are integrated into the collections to create a fun space for playing, discovery and literacy.

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A look inside the library

The library partners with and provides space for a wide array of community organizations, including Scholastic Book presentations, the Summer Scribblers writing program, Grove City Writers Group, school programs and civic organizations.  The library’s new location in the Grove City Town Center puts it at the heart of many community events. The library participates in Arts in the Alley and the Town Center Christmas Parade and hosts a holiday event featuring Santa Claus and the Signs of Christmas chorus.

Cbus Libraries Co-Founder Andrea Dixon grew up with and worked for Grove City Library.  The library’s transformation of space, thoughtfulness of design and generosity of services are an amazing improvement and wonderful gift to the Grove City community.

 

 

Oberlin College Conservatory Library

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This month’s feature on Oberlin College Libraries is a special traveling, two-part series.  This second installment focuses particularly on Oberlin’s Conservatory Library.  Please see our first part here.


The Conservatory Library at Oberlin College serves as a lively central hub for the college’s four music buildings.  Students meet, collaborate and even sing throughout the library.  In fact, while we toured the library, we heard a group of students working through and harmonizing on a music piece!

The library was created soon after Oberlin Conservatory of Music’s inauguration in 1865, making the conservatory the oldest continuously operating conservatory of music in the United States.  The current library building was constructed in 1963 and has undergone several enhancements. In 2000, the library’s collection was considerably expanded and a second story with high density shelving was added.  In 2010, the library obtained a vault for the library’s incredible special collections, and in 2015 the Conservatory Library Special Collections Reading Room was opened.

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Conservatory Librarian Deborah Campana shares a moment in the library’s sunny atrium

Conservatory Librarian Deborah Campana noted the library is an essential partner to the Oberlin College Conservatory of Music . The library ranks among the largest academic music libraries with approximately 270,000 items, including 80,000 sound recordings, 127,000 musical scores and almost 63,000 books about music.  Specialized online databases and  computers equipped with composition software expand students’ discovery and technical expertise.  The library continues to actively collect in the area of women musicians as well as ethnic, folk, jazz and other genres.

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Exhibit featuring the Milton J. and Mona C. Hinton Collection

The Conservatory Library’s amazing special collections, managed by Jeremy Smith, contain rare materials from the 1500s through today. The collection comprises of a wide array of recordings, music manuscripts, autographs, photographs, engravings, paintings, posters, playbills and instruments.  Jeremy oversees the ongoing digitization of the collections and creates engaging exhibits throughout Oberlin College’s campus.

The Conservatory Library at Oberlin College is a vibrant, musical space and a gem within the college.

Oberlin College Libraries

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This month’s feature on Oberlin College Libraries is a special traveling, two-part series.  Please join us on October 17th when we explore the libraries further, particularly the Oberlin College Conservatory Library.


Oberlin College, located in northern Ohio, celebrates a rich history of providing excellent equality in education.  The college, founded in 1833, was the first college in America to adopt a policy to admit African American students and the first to grant bachelor’s degrees to women in a coeducational program.  The city of Oberlin has a long history of supporting racial justice, including when the town banded together with neighboring Wellington to keep runaway slave, John Price, free. In addition to providing exceptional service to students, the Oberlin College Library helps to preserve the college’s history and educate students on the history of the institution through their amazing collections.  As a result of their shared history with the city, the college maintains an impressive collection of abolitionist materials and original records.

“From it’s inception, the school represents education and social justice. The library is the steward of that concept” – Alexia Hudson-Ward.

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Library Director Alexia Hudson-Ward and Head of Special Collections Ed Vermue show pieces from their abolitionist collection – slave stocks and chains leave a powerful impression when you feel the weight and learn the story

Hudson-Ward joined Oberlin College as the Azariah Smith Root Director of Libraries in July of 2016 and oversees the college’s four libraries – the main Mudd Center library and the arts, science and conservatory libraries.  The library’s founding director, Azariah Smith Root, was a visionary and thought leader behind the concept of bibliographic instruction who also held leadership roles with the American Library Association.

Hudson-Ward explained that the college’s 3,000 students have access to all of the libraries and visit them depending on which unique atmosphere suits their needs.  The Mudd Center library serves as a meeting place and student union, the art library provides hands on learning opportunities, the conservatory library is musical and often students are found singing in the stacks and the science library is a silent study space.

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Commemorative gateway in front of the art museum and library

Head of Special Collections Ed Vermue discussed the power of physical objects in the library collection.  Library staff are working to increase the use of haptic learning by delivering physical objects from their archives into the hands of students. These experiences engage students in learning and often lead them to explore other materials including documents and manuscripts. Oberlin is exploring methods to capture the essence of what is lost in the digitization process and to display materials while making them part of a readily available collection.

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Fully functioning media viewers are part of the library archives and special collection

The library has also been tasked with documenting the biography of President Marvin Krislov, who will depart the college at the end of the academic year. As the first “digital president,” the library will explore methods for capturing his presence on the campus through his social media and other digital communications.

Hudson-Ward is excited about the opportunities that lie ahead. As someone new to the campus, she enjoys seeing the greatness of the college and its libraries through fresh eyes and sharing her enthusiasm with her team, students and library visitors.